Day 5 – The ‘City’

Monument   

It is here that London started in Roman times – and nearly ended in 1666 in the Great Fire of London. The fire lasted 4 days and destroyed 80 per cent of medieval London; 14,000 houses, 87 churches and 44 (of 60) Livery Halls (i.e. business HQ’s). Built in 1677 the Monument commemorates the Great Fire. Today, it is still the world’s largest free standing stone column. . You can climb to the top of the Monument by a narrow winding staircase of 311 steps.

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Monument

Leadenhall Market   

Visit this beautiful original central London market for ‘white goods’ (i.e. poultry and diary). It is one of the oldest markets in London, dating from the 14th century, and is located in the historic centre of the City of London financial district. Today, there are many lunch venues feeding the City workers. You’ll recognise it as ‘Diagon Alley’ from the Harry Potter film!

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Leadenhall Market

Christmas at Leadenhall Market

Bank of England  

Financial, monetary and political stability persuade foreign government’s to store 3600 tonnes of gold right beneath your feet! Established in 1694 (to provide lenders to the Crown some confidence of getting their money back) by a Scotsman; William Patterson.

It is the central bank of the United Kingdom and the model on which most modern central banks have been based. In 1998, it became an independent public organisation with independence in setting monetary policy (i.e. the interest rate). It doesn’t offer consumer banking services – but you can visit the small museum and lift a gold bar!

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Bank of England

Royal Exchange  

This is London’s oldest shopping mall! The original building (from 1571) provided manufacturers and traders a space to show off their wares – seeking orders from London, Britain and Europe! The present building was occupied by the Lloyd’s insurance market for nearly 150 years. Today, it’s a marketplace for luxury goods – we suggest you leave your credit cards at a safe distance! It is on the steps of the Royal Exchange where proclamations (such as death of a monarch, confirmation of new monarch or the dissolution of parliament) are read out by either a royal herald or a crier.

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Royal Exchange

Mansion House   

This is the grand palatial home of the Lord Mayor of the City of London. It is used for some of the City of London’s official functions, including two annual White Tie dinners, hosted by the Lord Mayor. In early June, the Chancellor of the Exchequer gives their ‘Mansion House Speech’ (a state of the nation address). Architecturally, built in 1750, it’s a fine example of an Italian City Palace in the style of Palladio.

LONDON MANSION HOUSE
Mansion House

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